Composting Food Scraps With BioPod Plus Black Solider Fly Larvae System

Posted by Spencer Doepel on

 Throwing out leftover food scraps is never fun. A solution to this is having a composting area in your garden. Composting returns valuable nutrients to the soil to help maintain soil quality and fertility. But what to do if you don't have a garden or it's the winter ? Luckily a small little bug can help and they're called Black Soldier Flys.

Black Soldier Flys are native to North America and are ferocious eaters. They start their lives off as very small 5-Dol (5 Day old) larvae worms. They eat twice their body weight every day over 6 weeks. At the end of their larvae stage they grow a mouth to be more mobile and find a humid place to pupate. During pupation they don't move or eat. They will soon hatch into Black Soldier Flys but they still won't move until they're exposed to light. Once this happens they turn into flies and reproduce for 3-5 days. Every female can lay up to 500 eggs. This ensures a continuous system.

The BioPod Plus is a great solution and was built for composting small amounts of waste in small compact places. It comes with an Inner convenience lid that easily pivots, allowing for quick one handed dumping of food scraps, while shielding the top ventilation portal. It was designed to self harvest the adults and has a pair of angled, 40˚ migration ramps that allow for natural migration of larvae into the harvest bucket.

Once you have all these Black Soldier Fly larvae you can either feed them to reptiles, chickens, pigs, rodents or any type of aquatics. They're high in protein fat and calcium. Make sure to check out the link to buy the BioPod

 

 

 

 

 

 

Still here? Thanks for looking at the pictures and watching the video we really appreciate it. Please consider buying this product as it helps not only our business but the Black Solider Fly industry as a whole.

 

Additional References: 

https://www.eatcrickster.com/blog/black-soldier-fly


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